John Libbey Eurotext

Room tilt illusion in epilepsy Volume 23, issue 6, December 2021

Figures

  • Figure 1
  • Figure 2
Authors
1 Department of Neurology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
2 Neurology Division, Iowa City VA Medical Center, Iowa City, IA 52246, USA
3 Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
4 Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Visual Loss, Iowa VA Health Care System, Iowa City, IA 52246, USA
5 Department of Neurology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 at time of the case; currently at Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, Rochester, MN 55902, USA
* Correspondence: Deema Fattal Department of Neurology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA

Room tilt illusion (RTI) is a rare phenomenon in which a person transiently perceives their surroundings as tilted sideways or upside-down. It was first reported in 1805 when Bishopp described a 22-year-old woman who saw attendants stand on their heads, which she found amusing; her symptoms lasted for one hour and resolved with “ordinary treatment of hysteria” [1, 2]. RTI is typically around the center of vision and involves the entire surroundings and can be clockwise or counterclockwise [2, 3]. [...]