John Libbey Eurotext

Overview of clinical efficacy and risk data of benzodiazepines for prolonged seizures Volume 16, special issue 1, October 2014

Author
Department of Development and Regeneration, Section Paediatric Neurology, University Hospitals KULeuven, Leuven, Belgium
* Correspondence: Lieven Lagae Department of Development and Regeneration, Section Paediatric Neurology, University Hospitals KULeuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium

An historical overview is provided regarding the use of benzodiazepines for the treatment of acute prolonged convulsive seizures. It is clear that intravenous benzodiazepines remain a first step for the in-hospital treatment of prolonged seizures or status epilepticus. However, in the community, in a pre-hospital situation, intravenous administration is not possible. In recent years, it was shown that rectal, buccal, intranasal, and intramuscular administration of benzodiazepines is very effective as a first and safe treatment step. In many cases, rectal diazepam is not socially acceptable anymore, and therefore more emphasis is now put on buccal, intranasal, and intramuscular administration. At present, based on the available data, midazolam is the product of choice for the acute treatment of prolonged convulsive seizures.