JLE

L'Orthodontie Française

MENU

Maxillomandibular Advancement for OSA: A 25-year perspective Volume 93, special issue 1, Décembre 2022

Figures


  • Figure 1

  • Figure 2

Tables

Authors
1 Sleep Apnea Surgery Center, 1900 University Avenue, Suite 105, East Palo Alto, CA, USA
2 Pulmonary and Critical Care, Stanford University School Medicine, Stanford, 3165 Porter Dr, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
3 Deceased. Sleep Medicine Division, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, 3165 Porter Dr, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
* Correspondance : drli@sleepapneasurgery.com

Objective

The aim of this study was to evaluate the result of maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by a single surgeon.

Materials and Methods

Patients that underwent MMA for the treatment of OSA over a 25-year period were included in the study. Patients who initially presented for revision MMA surgery were excluded. Demographics (e.g., age, gender, pre- and post-MMA body mass index [BMI]), pre- and post-MMA cephalometrics (e.g., sella-nasion-point A angle [SNA], sella-nasion-point B angle [SNB], posterior airway space base of tongue [PAS]) and pre- and post-MMA sleep study metrics (e.g., respiratory disturbance index [RDI], lowest desaturation [SpO2-nadir], oxygen desaturation index [ODI], total sleep time [TST], % TST Stage N3 sleep, % TST rapid eye movement [REM] sleep) were abstracted. MMA surgical success was defined as a ≥ 50% reduction in RDI (or ODI) and post-MMA RDI (or ODI) < 20 events/hour. MMA surgical cure was defined as a post-MMA RDI (or ODI) < 5 events/hour.

Results

A total of 1010 patients underwent MMA for the treatment of OSA. The mean age was 39.6 ± 14.3 years, and the majority were male (77%). Nine hundred forty-one patients with complete pre- and postoperative PSG data were analyzed. The mean ODI and RDI improved from 32.6 ± 27.4 to 7.7 ± 15.5 and 39.1 ± 24.2 to 13.6 ± 14.6 events per hour, respectively. The overall surgical success and surgical cure based on ODI was 79.4% and 71.9%, respectively. The overall surgical success and surgical cure based on RDI was 73.1% and 20.7%, respectively. Stratified by preoperative RDI showed older age, greater BMI were associated with greater preoperative RDI. Bivariate predictors of greater RDI reduction include younger age, female gender, lower preoperative BMI, higher preoperative RDI, greater BMI reduction postoperatively and greater change in SNA and PAS. Bivariate predictors of surgical cure based on RDI (RDI < 5) include younger age, female gender, lower preoperative RDI, and greater change in SNA and PAS. Bivariate predictor of RDI success (RDI < 20) include younger age, female gender, lower preoperative BMI, lower preoperative RDI, greater BMI reduction, greater increase in SNA, SNB and PAS postoperatively. Comparison of the first 500 patients and the later 510 patients demonstrate patients undergoing MMA have become younger, having lower RDI while achieving a better surgical outcome. Linear multivariate associations of greater percentage RDI reduction include younger age, greater percent change of SNA, greater preoperative SNA, lower preoperative BMI and higher preoperative RDI.

Conclusions

MMA is an effective treatment to improve OSA, but the result can vary. Patient selection based on favorable prognostic factors and maximizing the advancement distance can improve outcomes.