John Libbey Eurotext

Hépato-Gastro & Oncologie Digestive

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Useful management of the liver transplant recipient Volume 25, issue 4, Avril 2018

Figures

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Tables

Authors
1 CHU de Rennes, Hôpital Pontchaillou, Service des maladies du foie, 2 rue Henri-Le-Guilloux, 35000 Rennes, France
2 Hôpital Pontchaillou, Inserm-CIC 1414, 2 rue Henri-Le-Guilloux, 35000 Rennes, France
3 CHU de Rennes, Hôpital Pontchaillou, Service de chirurgie hépatobiliaire et digestive, 2 rue Henri-Le-Guilloux, 35000 Rennes, France
4 CHU de Rennes, Université de Rennes 1, 2 rue Henri-Le-Guilloux, 35000 Rennes, France
5 CHU de Rennes, Hôpital Pontchaillou, Service des Maladies infectieuses et Réanimation médicale, 2 rue Henri-Le-Guilloux, 35000 Rennes, France
* Tirés à part

Surgical improvement and expansion of immunosuppression have led to the successful development of solid organ transplantation. But long-term medical complications persist and are responsible for a decline in survival from the first year after transplantation. After one year, recurrence of liver disease, chronic rejection, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disorders, kidney dysfunction and malignancies are leading causes of morbidity and mortality in this population. Diagnosis, management and prevention of complications after liver transplantation are important to improve long term outcomes. Therefore, maximizing long-term graft survival and reducing the need for retransplantation is paramount. Diligent management of modifiable post-liver transplantation factors including diabetes, hypertension and renal insufficiency may impact long-term mortality. Standardised follow-up combined with organised screening for medical and surgical complications is therefore essential to improve survival after transplantation.

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