John Libbey Eurotext

Hépato-Gastro & Oncologie Digestive

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Abdominal tumors of soft tissues (except GIST) Volume 23, issue 6, Juin 2016

Figures

  • Figure 1
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Tables

Authors
1 Institut Curie,
département de pathologie,
26, rue d’Ulm,
75005 Paris,
France
2 Institut Curie,
département de chirurgie,
26, rue d’Ulm,
75005 Paris,
France
3 Institut Curie,
département d’oncologie médicale,
26, rue d’Ulm,
75005 Paris,
France
4 Institut Curie,
département d’oncologie médicale,
35, rue Dailly,
92210 Saint-Cloud,
France
* Tirés à part

Non GIST abdominal tumors of soft tissues are generally poorly known by gastroenterologists due to their rarity and their heterogeneity related to both the histological type and the organ or compartment of origin. The diagnosis is often complex. Tumor material is obtained from core needle or excisional biopsies. Histological analysis is often associated with immunohistochemical evaluation and sometimes with FISH or molecular study (looking for point mutations, fusion transcripts by RT-PCR, complex genomic alterations by CGH array...). Depending on their location, these tumors can be grouped into four major categories: i) tumors developed from the gut wall dominated by leiomyomas and schwannomas; ii) tumors developed from the abdominal wall, the peritoneum, the mesentery and the omentum, dominated by desmoid tumors and the dermatofibrosarccoma protuberans (for the abdominal wall); iii) visceral tumors, dominated by two hepatic vascular malignant tumors, epithelioid hemangio-endothelioma and angiosarcoma iv) retroperitoneal tumors, dominated by well-differentiated and dedifferentiated liposarcoma.

The objective of this review is to describe the various entities, focusing on the most common, as well as the diagnostic strategy and the major therapeutic principles.