John Libbey Eurotext

Cahiers d'études et de recherches francophones / Santé

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Malaria and HIV infection in subSaharan Africa: Another match made in Hell? Volume 21, issue 3, Juil-Août-Sept

Authors
CHU Treichville service des maladies infectieuses et tropicales BP V3 Abidjan Côte d’Ivoire, Université de Cocody département de dermatologie-infectiologie unité de formation et de recherche des sciences médicales BP V166 Abidjan Côte d’Ivoire, Université de Cocody département d’hématologie et immunologie unité de formation et de recherche des sciences pharmaceutiques et biologiques BP V34 Abidjan Côte d’Ivoire, Laboratoire de parasitologie-mycologie unité de formation et de recherche des sciences médicales BP V166 Abidjan Côte d’Ivoire

Malaria and HIV are the most important infections in subSaharan Africa, in terms of the morbidity and mortality they cause. Current data suggest a possible interaction between the two diseases. Cellular immunodeficiency due to HIV infection might increase the frequency and severity of malaria, as local populations in endemic areas become less resistant. Likewise, the onset and repetition of malaria episodes might activate HIV replication and thus decrease the number of CD4 lymphocytes and accelerate the disease course. Despite their geographical coincidence, the epidemiological profiles of malaria and HIV differ considerably. The entanglement of these two diseases has epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic consequences in subSaharan Africa that raise concerns that HIV with malaria, as with tuberculosis, is a match made in Hell.