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Determinants in the transition to the suicidal act in Huntington's disease Volume 86, issue 7, septembre 2010

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Authors
Centre hospitalier universitaire d'Angers, Département de psychiatrie et psychologie médicale, 4, rue Larrey, 49933 Angers, France, Chef de Clinique-Assistant des Hôpitaux, Département de médecine interne et gériatrie, CHU d'Angers ; UPRES EA 2646, Université d'Angers, France, Praticien hospitalier, Département de pédopsychiatrie, CHU d'Angers, France, Praticien hospitalier, Département de psychiatrie et psychologie médicale, CHU d'Angers, France, Praticien hospitalo-universitaire, Département de neurologie, CHU d'Angers, France, Professeur des universités-praticien hospitalier, Chef de service, Département de psychiatrie et psychologie médicale, CHU d'Angers, France, Chef de clinique-Assistant des hôpitaux, Département de psychiatrie et psychologie médicale, CHU d'Angers ; UPRES EA 2646, Université d'Angers, France

Huntington's disease is an inherited neurodegenerative disease with a dominant autosomal transmission, which occurs in adulthood. Individuals with Huntington's disease have a double risk of death by suicide compared to the general population. The risk factors for suicide, as in Huntington's disease, are both intrinsic and extrinsic. In addition to the classic risk factors of suicide, clinical and environmental particularities should be searched in the management of patients with Huntington's disease. Depression should also be monitored. The environment of the patient should be documented. Within the family unit, the question of family relationships, suffering of the caregiver, marital disputes that may occur and subsequently influence suicidal behaviour of these patients.