John Libbey Eurotext

Acute symptomatic seizures: an educational, evidence-based review Article à paraître

Illustrations

  • Figure 1
  • Figure 2
  • Figure 3
  • Figure 4

Tableaux

Auteurs
1 Department of Neurology, Christian Doppler Klinik, Paracelsus Medical University and Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Salzburg, Austria, Affiliated EpiCARE Partner
2 Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Department of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
3 Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University and the IWK Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
4 Department of Paediatric Neurosciences, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Edinburgh, UK
5 Department of Neurology, Hospital of Merano (SABES-ASDAA), Merano-Meran, Italy
6 Neurological Clinic, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Marche Polytechnic University, Ancona, Italy
7 Neuroscience Institute, Christian Doppler University Hospital, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria
8 Department of Public Health, Health Services Research and Health Technology Assessment, UMIT – University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology, Hall in Tirol, Austria
* Correspondence: Matthias Mauritz Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Neurology and Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Ignaz-Harrer-Strasse 79, Salzburg 5020, Austria

Acute symptomatic seizures occurring in close temporal relationship with an acute CNS insult are distinct from epilepsy and occur frequently in clinical practice. The aim of this educational review is to provide information on the most important aspects related to acute symptomatic seizures that will allow clinicians to accurately distinguish acute symptomatic seizures from epilepsy in their patients. We explain the definition of acute symptomatic seizures and we illustrate how acute symptomatic seizures differ from epilepsy. We describe acute symptomatic seizures in the context of their various underlying aetiologies and we discuss the approach to the management of patients with acute symptomatic seizures.