John Libbey Eurotext

Sensitivity of magnetoencephalography as a diagnostic tool for epilepsy: a prospective study Volume 22, numéro 3, June 2020

Illustrations

  • Figure 1

Tableaux

Auteurs
1 Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Academic Centre for Epileptology, Kempenhaeghe / MUMC+, Heeze, in collaboration with Faculty of Health, Medicine & Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht,
2 Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Academic Centre for Epileptology, Kempenhaeghe / MUMC+, Heeze,
3 Biomedical Image Analysis, BioMedical Technology, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven,
4 Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Elisabeth-Twee Steden Hospital, Tilburg,
5 Department of Clinical Neurophysiology and MEG Centre, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam University Medical Centre, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam,
6 Department of Public Mental Health, Centre for Economic Evaluations, Trimbos Institute (Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction), Utrecht,
7 Department of Health Services Research, CAPHRI School of Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
* Correspondence: Albert J. Colon Sterkselseweg 65 5591 VE Heeze The Netherlands

Aim

The diagnostic process for epilepsy can be lengthy and stressful, which may delay the start of treatment. The objective of this study was to determine the benefit of routine magnetoencephalography (MEG) with regard to diagnostic gain, compared to routine electroencephalography (EEG), EEG following sleep deprivation (EEGsd), and 24-hour EEG.