John Libbey Eurotext

Tooth-brushing epilepsy: an SEEG study and surgical treatment Volume 22, numéro 4, August 2020

Vidéo

  • Tooth-brushing epilepsy: an SEEG study and surgical treatment

Illustrations

  • Figure 1
  • Figure 2
  • Figure 3
  • Figure 4
Auteurs
1 Epilepsy Section, Department of Neurology, Hospital de Clínicas, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
2 Department of Neurology, British Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina
3 Department of Radiology, British Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina
4 Epilepsy Surgery Section, Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital de Clínicas, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
5 Department of Neurosurgery, Clínica de Cuyo, Mendoza, Argentina
* Correspondence: Federico Sánchez González Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital de Clínicas, Av. Córdoba 2351, C1121ABJ CABA, Buenos Aires, Argentina

We report a patient with reflex tooth-brushing-triggered epilepsy, associated with a post-central lesion within the right somatosensory face area. Contralateral facial sensory and motor phenomena, associated with contralateral upper limb extension, were present at seizure onset after gingival stimulation, but seizures could also be induced by contact with solid food or liquids. Spontaneous seizures also were recorded. Secondary generalization was infrequent. Stereoelectroencephalography implantation was performed, with seizure recording and cortical/subcortical stimulation for mapping, to identify the precise extent of surgical resection. Complete postoperative control of epilepsy was achieved, accompanied by a mild and transient neurological deficit. [Published with video sequence].