JLE

Epileptic Disorders

MENU

Temporal encephalocele: a rare but treatable cause of temporal lobe epilepsy Volume 24, numéro 6, December 2022

Figure 1.

Interictal EEG. (A) Bipolar longitudinal montage. (B) Average montage showing frontally dominant generalized spike-and-wave discharges (arrow) and right temporal spikes (arrowhead). (C) Ictal EEG showing a burst of frontally dominant generalized spike-and-wave discharges, followed by right fronto-temporal temporal 2-3-Hz spike-and-wave discharges, evolving into right fronto-temporal polymorphic 5-6-Hz rhythm (Case 6).

Figure 2.

(A, B) Axial T2 image. (C) Axial FLAIR image showing an encephalocele (arrow) protruding through the left middle cranial fossa. (D) FLAIR sagittal image of encephalocele protruding through the left middle cranial fossa (arrowhead). (E) PET image showing left temporal hypometabolism (star). (F) Intraoperative photograph of encephalocele showing deficient dura and gliotic brain, terminating into bony pits (arrow) (Case 1).

Figure 3.

(A) T2 axial image showing a left encephalocele (star) (Case 2). (B) T2 axial image showing a right encephalocele (arrow) (Case 3). (C) Axial T2 image showing a left TE (arrow) (Case 4). (D) Axial T2 image showing a right TE (arrow) (Case 5). (E) Coronal T2 image showing a right TE (star) (Case 6). (F) Coronal T2 image showing a left TE (arrow) (Case 7). (G) T2 axial image showing a right TE (arrow) (Case 8). (H) FLAIR coronal image showing a left TE (arrow) (Case 9).