John Libbey Eurotext

De novo status epilepticus possibly related to battery depletion of anterior thalamic brain stimulator Volume 24, numéro 1, February 2022

Illustrations

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Auteurs
1 Epilepsy Unit, Neurology Department, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Weizmann St. 6, Tel Aviv, Israel
2 Tel Aviv University, Sackler School of Medicine, 68 Einstein Street, Tel Aviv, Israel
3 Functional Neurosurgery Unit, Neurosurgery Department, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Weizmann St. 6, Tel Aviv, Israel
* Correspondence: Gadi Miron Epilepsy Unit, Neurology Department, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Weizmann St. 6, Tel Aviv, Israel

Anterior thalamic deep brain stimulation is an effective therapeutic option for patients with drug-refractory focal epilepsy who are poor surgical candidates. Although the precise mechanism of action of thalamic neurostimulation is unknown, studies demonstrating increased efficacy over time have raised the possibility that therapeutic benefits are mediated by stimulation-related long-term neuroplastic changes. Adverse effects related to hardware malfunction have been previously described, and most commonly include local infection, sensory disturbances, and migration of leads. However, the withdrawal effect of sudden deep brain stimulation malfunction on seizure control is unclear. We present the case of a 21-year-old patient with intractable focal epilepsy who developed status epilepticus concurrently with unexpected deep brain stimulator battery failure, 21 months post implantation. This case demonstrates an unfamiliar possible adverse effect of anterior thalamic stimulation withdrawal and emphasizes the importance of stimulator hardware assessment in patients presenting with seizure worsening.