John Libbey Eurotext

Epileptic Disorders

The Educational Journal of the International League Against Epilepsy

Autosomal recessive progressive myoclonus epilepsy due to impaired ceramide synthesis Volume 18, supplément 2, September 2016

Illustrations

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Auteurs
1 Regional Epilepsy Center, Reggio Calabria, Italy; Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro, Italy
2 Department of Neurosciences, ‘G. Gaslini’ Institute, Genova, Italy
3 Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Messina, Italy
4 Division of Child Neurology and Psychiatry, University of Messina, Italy
5 Hôpital Henri-Gastaut, Marseille, France
* Correspondence : Pasquale Striano Department of Neurosciences, ‘G. Gaslini’ Institute, Genova, Italy
  • Mots-clés : progressive myoclonus epilepsies, epilepsy, ceramide synthase, neurodegeneration, ER stress response
  • DOI : 10.1684/epd.2016.0857
  • Page(s) : 120-7
  • Année de parution : 2016

Autosomal recessive progressive myoclonus epilepsy due to impaired ceramide synthesis is an extremely rare condition, so far reported in a single family of Algerian origin presenting an unusual, severe form of progressive myoclonus epilepsy characterized by myoclonus, generalized tonic-clonic seizures and moderate to severe cognitive impairment, with probable autosomal recessive inheritance. Disease onset was between 6 and 16 years of age. Genetic study allowed to identify a homozygous nonsynonymous mutation in CERS1, the gene encoding ceramide synthase 1, a transmembrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), catalyzes the biosynthesis of C18-ceramides. The mutation decreased C18-ceramide levels. In addition, downregulation of CerS1 in neuroblastoma cell line showed activation of ER stress response and induction of proapoptotic pathways. This observation demonstrates that impairment of ceramide biosynthesis underlies neurodegeneration in humans.