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Magnesium Research

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Effect of urine pH and magnesium on calcium oxalate saturation Volume 30, numéro 4, October-November-December 2017

Illustrations

  • Figure 1
  • Figure 2
  • Figure 3
  • Figure 4

Tableaux

Auteurs
1 Charles and Jane Pak Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research
2 Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Mineral Metabolism
3 University of Virginia Medical Center, Charlottesville, VA, USA
4 Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Biostatistics
5 Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology
6 Department of Physiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA
* Correspondence: Naim M. Maalouf, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Mineral Metabolism, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390-8885, USA
a Silvia Ferrè and Jacob Grange contributed equally to this work
  • Mots-clés : pH, magnesium, hypomagnesiuria, calcium oxalate, kidney stones
  • DOI : 10.1684/mrh.2018.0429
  • Page(s) : 107-19
  • Année de parution : 2017

Background

Hypomagnesiuria is a common biochemical finding in patients with calcium oxalate (CaOx) nephrolithiasis. Clinical trials using Mg supplements as therapy against CaOx stones have shown mixed results. We tested the effect of Mg administration in healthy subjects under conditions of controlled urine pH (UpH) on urinary Ca excretion rate (UCaV) and CaOx saturation.