John Libbey Eurotext

Flashing lights and epileptic spasms: should we be routinely performing intermittent photic stimulation in infants? Volume 24, issue 1, February 2022

Video

  • Flashing lights and epileptic spasms: should we be routinely performing intermittent photic stimulation in infants?

Figures

  • Figure 1
  • Figure 2

Tables

Authors
1 Robert Haslam Fellow in Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada
2 Clinical Neurophysiology, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada
3 Departments of Pediatrics, Clinical Neuroscience. Member, Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute (ACHRI) & Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI), Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada
* Correspondence: Marvin H. Braun Robert Haslam Fellow in Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada

Abnormal cortical excitation in response to photic stimulation (photosensitivity) has historically been associated with generalized epilepsies, in patients outside of infancy. At our tertiary centre, we encountered a patient with infantile spasms secondary to a mutation in ALG13 (c320A>G) who had photic stimulation-induced epileptic spasms over a broad range of frequencies on multiple EEGs, which were worse without treatment and decreased as treatment was escalated. This is the first reported case of epileptic spasms triggered by photic stimulation and it is unclear whether the phenomenon is unique to this patient, to those with this mutation or whether it is present in a broader group of patients with infantile spasms.