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European Cytokine Network

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Innate lymphoid cell subsets and their cytokines in autoimmune diseases Volume 31, issue 4, December 2020

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Authors
1 Department of Hematology, School of Allied Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran, Iran
2 School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
3 Research Center for Immunodeficiencies, Pediatrics Center of Excellence, Children's Medical Center, Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran
4 Network of Immunity in Infection, Malignancy and Autoimmunity (NIIMA), Universal Scientific Education and Research Network (USERN), Tehran, Iran
5 Laser Research Centre, Faculty of Health Science, University of Johannesburg, Doornfontein, Johannesburg, 2028 South Africa
6 Network of Immunity in Infection, Malignancy and Autoimmunity (NIIMA), Universal Scientific Education and Research Network (USERN), Johannesburg, 2028 South Africa
7 Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
* Correspondence: N. Rezaei, Research Center for Immunodeficiencies, Children's Medical Center Hospital, 62 Qarib St, Keshavarz Blvd, Tehran 14194, Iran.

Both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system are involved in the development of autoimmune diseases. The main mechanism of disease is due to adaptive immune cells that are active against self-antigens. These cells can cause major damage to body tissues. Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are an important type of innate immune cell, whose role has been highlighted in recent years. ILCs are responsible for some of the inflammation in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss the role of ILCs in the immune response, as well as their involvement in various autoimmune diseases.

 
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