John Libbey Eurotext

Science et changements planétaires / Sécheresse

Arid and semiarid rangeland monitoring in North America Volume 17, issue 1, Janvier-Juin 2006

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Authors
United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Jornada Experimental Range, MSC 3JER, NMSU, Box 30003, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8003, USA, Programa de Botanica, Instituto de Recursos Naturales, Km 36.5 Carretera México-Texcoco, Montecillo, Texcoco Edo. de México, CP 56230, Mexique, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada/Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada, 5403 - 1 Avenue South, P.O. Box 3000, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada T1J 4B1, United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service, Jornada Experimental Range, MSC 3JER, NMSU, Box 30003, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8003, USA, PO Box 1057, Safford, Arizona 85548, USA, GrassWorks, Inc., 322 Otero Street, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501, USA
  • Key words: rangelands, data base, arid zone
  • Page(s) : 235-41
  • Published in: 2006

Canada, the United States and Mexico all have a long history of rangeland monitoring. However none have developed a nationwide database or even a standardized set of protocols. The lack of standardization, inadequately developed relationships between management objectives and monitoring protocols, and an emphasis on data collection rather than analysis and interpretation have limited the value of past monitoring efforts. The future of monitoring is bright in all three countries. New policies reward ranchers who can document positive changes on their land. Non-equilibrium theory developed in Europe, Africa, Australia and North America increases the value of monitoring data. New protocols increasingly focus monitoring on ecological processes.