John Libbey Eurotext

L'Orthodontie Française

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The contribution of orofacial myofunctional reeducation to the treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSA): a systematic review of the literature Volume 90, issue 3-4, Septembre-Décembre 2019 - Numéro spécial international : Troubles Respiratoires Obstructifs du Sommeil et Orthodontie

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Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSA) is a widespread and under-diagnosed condition, making it a major public health and safety problem. Orofacial myofunctional reeducation (OMR) has been shown to be effective in the multidisciplinary treatment of OSA in children, adolescents and adults and is prescribed at several stages of OSA management. Objectives: The main objective of this systematic literature review was to evaluate the effectiveness of active or passive orofacial myofunctional reeducation (OMR) in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in children, adolescents and adults. Methods: The systematic literature review was undertaken from the three electronic databases: Medline (via PubMed), Cochrane Library, Web of Science Core Collection, and supplemented by a limited grey literature search (Google Scholar) in order to identify the studies evaluating the effectiveness of the OMR on OSA. The primary outcome of interest was a decrease in the Apnea–Hypopnea Index (AHI) of at least five episodes per hour compared to the baseline state. Secondary outcomes were an improvement in subjective sleep quality, sleep quality measured by night polysomnography and subjectively measured quality of life. Results: Only ten studies met all the inclusion criteria. Eight were randomized controlled clinical trials, one was a prospective cohort study and another was a retrospective cohort study. Six studies were devoted to adult OSA and four to pediatric OSA. All included studies were assessed as “low risk of bias” based on the 12 bias risk criteria of the Cochrane Back Review Group. Based on the available evidence, RMO allows a significant reduction in AHI, up to 90.6% in children and up to 92.06% in adults. It significantly reduces the intensity and frequency of snoring, helps reduce daytime sleepiness, limits the recurrence of OSA symptoms after adenoamygdalectomy in children and improves adherence to PPC therapy. Passive RMO, with the assistance provided to the patient by wearing a custom orthosis, increases adherence to reeducation, significantly improves snoring intensity, AHI and significantly increases the upper airway. Conclusions: Published data show that orofacial myofunctional reeducation is effective in the multidisciplinary treatment of OSA in children, adolescents and adults and should be widely prescribed at several stages of OSA management. Passive RMO, with the pearl mandibular advancement orthosis designed by Michèle Hervy-Auboiron, helps to compensate for the frequent non-compliance observed during active RMO treatments.