John Libbey Eurotext

Epileptic Disorders

The Educational Journal of the

Ictal and interictal perfusion variations measured by SISCOM analysis in typical childhood absence seizures Volume 6, issue 4, December 2004

Videos

  • Ictal and interictal perfusion variations measured by SISCOM analysis in typical childhood absence seizures
  • Ictal and interictal perfusion variations measured by SISCOM analysis in typical childhood absence seizures
  • Ictal and interictal perfusion variations measured by SISCOM analysis in typical childhood absence seizures

Figures

See all figures

Authors
Inserm U398, Clinique Neurologique, Hôpital Civil, Institut de Physique Biologique, CNRS UMR 7004, Strasbourg, France
  • Key words: cerebral blood flow, SPECT, childhood absence seizures
  • Page(s) : 247-53
  • Published in: 2004

Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is currently used in the presurgical evaluation of medically intractable partial epilepsies, but not very often, in generalized epilepsy. In the present study, we used the SISCOM procedure, which represents the fusion of MRI and ictal‐interictal difference SPECT images using 99mTc‐ECD, to study cerebral blood flow changes during the ictal and postictal phases of typical childhood absence seizures. The study was performed on four children with typical, difficult to treat absence seizures, aged 10‐13 years at the time of scan. The delay between the onset of absence seizures and the injection of 99mTc‐ECD was carefully noted. One scan was performed during the ictal phase and showed diffuse blood flow decreases, while the three other scans performed during the postictal phase, showed generalized blood flow increase. These data are consistent with most previous data reporting generalized changes in functional activity, not limited to the thalamo‐cortical circuit in which absence seizures originate, and a decrease in cerebral blood flow during the ictal phase. Our data are concordant with the hypothesis that neuronal activity underlying the occurrence of spike‐and‐wave discharges does not seem to require an increase in metabolic demand and blood flow rates. [Published with videosequences]