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Bulletin du Cancer

Insights of young French surgical oncologists: motives and training Volume 99, numéro 2, Février 2012

  • Auteur(s) : Sophie Deneuve, Caroline Rivera, Nicolas Carrabin, Antoine Douard, Laurent Plard, Mathieu Peyre, Pierre Mordant , Institut Gustave-Roussy, département de chirurgie ORL et cervicofaciale, 114, rue Édouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif Cedex, France, CHU de Bordeaux, hôpital Haut-Lévêque, service de chirurgie thoracique, avenue de Magellan, 33604 Pessac, France, Centre Léon-Bérard, département de chirurgie gynécologique, 8, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France, CHU de Bordeaux, hôpital Pellegrin, service de chirurgie urologique, place Amélie-Raba-Léon, 33076 Bordeaux, France, CHU de Caen, département de chirurgie digestive, avenue de la Côte-de-Nacre, 14033 Caen Cedex 9, France, Hôpital Beaujon, service de neurochirurgie, 100, boulevard du Général-Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France, Hôpital européen Georges-Pompidou, service de chirurgie thoracique, 20, rue Leblanc, 75015 Paris, France
  • Mots-clés : cancer, surgical oncology, training, resident, fellows
  • Page(s) : 155-62
  • DOI : 10.1684/bdc.2011.1532
  • Année de parution : 2012

Introduction. In France, surgical oncology is not recognized as a unique specialty, but as a sub-specialization offered to surgeons in training. To date, their motives and training have not been studied. Materials and methods. We set a dedicated online survey suggested to 102 surgeons applying for the specific national degree in surgical oncology. Results. The answer rate was 60%. Responders were constituted of a majority of male (61%), their median age was 31 years. They were mainly residents (33%) and fellows working in university (25%) or non-university (28%) hospitals. Most responders have chosen their organ specialization at the beginning, and their oncologic sub-specialization at the middle of their residency, after a meeting with a senior surgeon. Regarding practical education, 85% used surgical videos, 62% mechanical training devices, 60% animal surgery, and 38% cadaver dissection. Regarding career expectations, 67% would like to work in a cancer centre, 51% in a university hospital, and 26% in a private institution. To explain these choices, 51% referred to research and 65% to teaching interests. Conclusion. This study outlines the role of mentorship and the lack of practical teaching outside the operating room during the training in surgical oncology in France.

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